What was the last comic you read?

Discuss Spidey's comics, or any other comics that you like.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by WolfCypher » Tue Jul 25, 2017 10:17 am

Superman 27 - C-
Waaaay too preachy, patronizing, overly soapboxy...

Batman 27 - B+
Tom King always delivers at least one issue in his arcs I genuinely like and I'm wondering if this is the sole one, or if I'll like anymore issues. Because I've not been feeling this arc to be honest.

Super Sons 6 - B+

Venom 152 - B-
Inoffensive issue that I enjoyed...Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur was not needed at all.

Edge of Venomverse 1 - F

Edge of Venomverse 2 - F
Finally read these proper. Jesus fu---...
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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by Phantom Roxas » Tue Jul 25, 2017 9:14 pm

Been going through some New 52 trades to close the gap between the initial New 52 series I was actually interested in before I focus more on Rebirth. I recently read the third and final trade of Demon Knights.

I'd heard that there was a steep drop in the writing when Robert Venditti took over the writing, mostly regarding Sir Ystin the Shining Knight, but I didn't think it was that bad. The biggest concern was that Paul Cornell portrayed Sir Ystin as intersex, while dialogue in Robert Venditti's run mostly uses female pronouns, with all of one exception where someone calls Ystin a male, though I think I might have just misread that dialogue. If anything, the issue about Ystin's gender has more to do with the art than the writing.

What happened ease the transition into Venditti's writing was that Bernard Chang stayed on as the writer. However, once he left as the artist, the art got much worse. It was a little distracting to keep up with the story because the art simply seemed... chaotic. That, or massive change in art style was hard for me to adjust to.

That said, Demon Knights kind of reminds me of a larger problem with the New 52. One thing I really like that they had done was that a lot of the books were originally categorized into one of seven groups. While have two that were literally titled "The Dark" and "The Edge" highlights the major problem with DC's shift in tone with the New 52, I honestly liked the Dark line. It showcased the supernatural side of the DC Universe. Sword of Sorcery and I, Vampire in particular were standouts for me, but it became very clear what the biggest problem with the Dark books were. Since the Dark line was their way of integrating Vertigo into the main universe, they really wanted to make a point about how they were using Constantine. He became the special guest star, appearing in books like Sword of Sorcery and I, Vampire, pretty much derailing the plots of both books.

Demon Knights seemed liked it simply didn't "fit" with some plans that DC had. During Forever Evil, almost all of the Dark books, save for Swamp Thing and Animal Man, were taking part in the Blight crossover. That became their priority, and while I believe Demon Knights did suffer low sales, it didn't help that it was one of the few books where it was absolutely impossible for Constantine to show up. So, in the end, the book leaves several plot threads completely unresolved, and it just reminds me that I don't care about Constantine. DC dedicated a whole month to "The Black Diamond Probability", since the Black Diamond appeared in books like Sword of Sorcery and Demon Knights, as well as Team 7 and Catwoman. And Paul Cornell had plans to connect the Demon Knights with the Daemonites of Stormwatch, with Merlin naming the Demon Knights his "Stormwatch". Robert Venditti even acknowledged that much.

So, I can't exactly blame Robert Venditti for a lot of what happened in the book. It seemed like this book just got the raw end of the deal. I had a fun time reading it, but it's also rather frustrating thinking about how much potential was lost. The New 52 tried to set up a wide array of recurring plot elements that spanned several books that otherwise seemed unrelated (Basilisk comes to mind), but in the end, either nothing came of all that setup, or only one book follows up on it, pretty much doing nothing else with the books that built it up.

Demon Knights started off as a good book in its own right, but ended up becoming one of the best examples of how DC really had no idea what they were planning in the long term for these books, and pretty much cut off any attempt at overarching storytelling. By the time Rebirth began, Scott Snyder and Geoff Johns were the only ones who had seen their initial New 52 books through to the end. Scott Snyder had all of Batman, and Geoff Johns had most of Justice League, save for the last two issues, which were bridges for other books into Rebrith anyway. And now we have Dark Nights: Metal and Doomsday Clock. Both of them continue their stories in one way or another. And yet, there is so much more that got dropped or changed from the early days of the New 52. It's rather frustrating that Doomsday Clock and Metal are the ones that are driving DC Rebirth right now.
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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by stillanerd » Thu Aug 03, 2017 2:32 pm

Because somebody has to, I've decided to keep track and review of all these Marvel Generations one-shots that are coming out. The first one was the one teaming up The Incredible Hulk and Totally Awesome Hulk. With the exception of one scene, this definitely wasn't worth the price tag, extra page count, or the hype. Because it's otherwise an okay, but unremarkable Hulk story really.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by Constantine » Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:38 pm

Decided to get caught back up on Spider-Gwen.

I really liked volume one. It reminded me a lot of the Lee/Ditko era of Spider-Man -- the stories were fun but grounded and had a great emotional core, plus Gwen was far from having the whole super-heroing thing down. It also had good world building for its own universe and had a decent supporting cast that it used liberally. Then volume two started and a lot of the fun quickly faded and it instead took on a constantly dour and dark tone that became hard to enjoy. Imagine DeMatteis' early '90s Spectacular run being the only Spider-Man that was being put out. Sure, they were interesting stories but that grim, gloomy tone would have quickly worn thin (although even JMD knew well enough to lighten up with the Fabulous Frogman story).

The arc that made me take a break from Spider-Gwen was the Green Goblin one. Firstly there was making Peter Parker into the super-powered equivalent of a school shooter (I think Gwen, as she reminisces about her days with Peter, even says he was sick before becoming the Lizard) and presenting Gwen's relationship with him as her seeming to pity him rather than having any genuine feelings for him but there was also the ending. I'm probably just a traditionalist when it comes to comics but I'd much rather have had Harry Osborn become an archenemy as the Green Goblin for Gwen (much like, you know, the Green Goblin usually is, which I think the book really needs) instead of the characters talking about subverting tropes and not doing the whole 'super hero vs super villain' thing leading to a reconciliation between the two. So, yeah, that arc rubbed me the wrong way and I stopped reading Spider-Gwen for a while.

Recently I'd read about the upcoming Gwenom arc and seen the artwork for her new costume and thought it looked cool and sounded interesting so I picked the series back up. Sadly, it seems to have doubled down on the whole 'dark and dour' thing. The biggest reprieve from that was definitely the Spider-Women crossover. It actually used the other books' characters and the whole alternate universe thing to good effect and also advanced Spider-Gwen's own stories, making it feel like a genuine story arc for her book rather than just a cash grab to hopefully improve sales of the three books. Interacting with the other books also forced Spider-Gwen to become a super hero comic again for at least the duration of the crossover.

Which, alongside the constantly morose tone, is probably my biggest problem with volume two of Spider-Gwen -- outside of the crossovers, there hasn't been much in the way of regular super heroing or even much heroics in the book after she teamed up with Captain America to investigate the Lizards in the sewers very early in the volume. Since then every 'villain' has been a threat exclusively to Gwen; there's been no stopping the Sandman from robbing a bank or the Shocker from holding the city's electric grid for ransom. It's not like this Spider-Woman doesn't do those sort of adventures, the annual had a short story taking place over seven pages called 'Eight Days a Week' with each page representing a day (and each done by a different artist) showing her going on a different adventure, including the likes of fighting Stilt-Man and helping Spider-Ham take on his universe's Doc Ock.

Despite all that complaining I do like the series. Spider-Woman/Gwen's character is great and fairly nuanced, each issue is well paced and structured as well as mostly well written (the humor especially is just right for me), and I love Robbi Rodriguez' art and Rico Renzi's vibrant coloring. Yet the constant sullen, brooding tone of the series for the past year+, the occasional plot misstep, and the seeming refusal to let Gwen be a regular super hero at all is enough to turn me off from the book. I plan to keep with it for a while longer but unless they eventually lighten up the tone and with Robbi Rodriguez leaving soon due to health issues I'll probably end up dropping it again soon.

Oh, and I didn't bother with 'Sitting in a Tree'. I didn't see a reason to waste my time or money on a story that seemed to exist solely to pander to the Tumblr crowd and their inexplicit pairing of Miles and Gwen. Seriously, the two exchanged maybe ten words between them during Spider-Verse and that was the entirety of their interaction up until that arc. Plus, having not gotten back into Spider-Gwen until after that had ended I'd already read that the only thing of importance that happens for the Spider-Gwen book is the introduction of Earth-65's Scorpion. And, indeed, as long as you know about that you can go from #15 to #19 without missing a beat. It seems like the crossover was sprung on Jason Latour at the last second and that he had the scripts for his next few issues already finished because, seriously, outside of a line about Murdock wanting the Scorpion dead #19 picks up right where #15 leaves off. It also just seemed kinda... creepy, with Miles being 16 and Gwen being 19. Which, yes, isn't that large of a difference but unlike say a 26 year old and a 29 year old, some one at 16 is still developing and maturing. Plus, from what I've read of Miles, Bendis writes him as more of a young teenager whereas Latour writes Gwen as an adult.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by Spider-Padre » Mon Aug 07, 2017 7:31 pm

Totally Awesome Hulk TPB. Cho vs. some alien monster-collecting woman, then Cho vs. the Enchantress. More entertaining than I expected it to be. Though both stories were about women throwing themselves at Cho in his Hulk form, which seems like calculated ego-flattery for teen male readers. The idea that the Hulk "condition" is an amping-up of the distinct id of whoever the Hulkified person may be (rather than just turning into a beast) leaves room for a lot of other potential leads to becomes Hulks.

For some reason, they had Fin Fang Foom be just a roaring sea-monster. I thought he was intelligent.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by stillanerd » Fri Aug 11, 2017 8:17 pm

Did a review for this issue, and while I did think this was much better than the Generations: Hulk issue, I also don't think this was an instant X-Men classic, either. But it's certainly a darn good comic. If anything, I think this would've worked far better if this had been an issue of Jean Grey instead of it's own one-shot tied into a quasi event. Just reduce the page count, trim some a few scenes in the beginning, and you're pretty much all set to go.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by stillanerd » Sat Aug 12, 2017 2:04 pm

I also did a review of Venom #153, the conclusion of "The Land Before Crime" where Eddie Brock goes up against the mighty Stegron. While I felt it didn't finish as strong as it could have, I still thought this story was just a fun, b-movie style romp.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by Vaegrin » Wed Aug 16, 2017 10:07 am

My new books for the week:
  • Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #10
  • Aquaman #27
  • Batman #29
  • Dark Knights: Metal #1
  • Superman #29
I found myself pleased with every one of these books, but the highlights were Renew Your Vows and Aquaman. Batman was excellent, but that's to be expected at this point. Dark Knights: Metal was an absolute blast to read--this is what event comics should be. Superman was an enjoyable start to what looks like it will be a fun, self-contained two-part story.

This week's issue of Renew Your Vows is the moment where this book has fully hit its stride. This book has always been good, but this arc is shaping up to be the moment where everything that has been built over the first nine issues finally comes together to make the book great. I have gladly purchased every issue, but now I am truly sold.

The newest issue of Aquaman is not necessarily the best new book of the week, but the one that has finally divested me of the last of my doubts. I like Aquaman, and his relationship with Mera is a breath of fresh air, but for all the people I have seen praise Aquaman as one of the best books in Rebirth, the first 24 issues simply did not work for me. This does. I have stuck with the book this long because of my affection for the characters and because I know that Dan Abnett is capable of great work, and with this new direction in Aquaman he and Stjepan Sejic are getting it done in a big way. I couldn't be happier.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by stillanerd » Thu Aug 17, 2017 2:48 pm

Did a review of Generations: Wolverine, and I thought the closing scene between Logan and Laura was excellent, especially if you're a fan of both characters. The rest of this comic, however? The first three-quarters of the story? I didn't think it was all that great. If anything, I think Tom Taylor actually did a disservice in how tried building up Laura as Wolverine in comparison to Logan.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by stillanerd » Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:23 pm

I thought this was one of the better one of these Generations one-shots, although it was imperfect. It works well as a young Thor story, though I did feel the "gender politics," if you will, involving Jane Foster/Thor felt awkward and contradictory. Also, the art was really good in some panels, but also really off the mark in others.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by stillanerd » Fri Sep 01, 2017 2:20 pm

What's this? A Generations issue which gave both the classic hero and the legacy hero equal importance and which was actually very fun to read? And it's Hawkeye to boot! Yeah, after the last four Generations one-shots, this was quite the pleasant surprise.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by stillanerd » Fri Sep 08, 2017 11:35 am

So Generations: The Iron (Iron Man and Ironheart #1? Worst of the Marvel Generations one-shots, or...worst of the Marvel Generations one shots?

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by Masked Guy » Fri Sep 08, 2017 2:20 pm

stillanerd wrote:So Generations: The Iron (Iron Man and Ironheart #1? Worst of the Marvel Generations one-shots, or...worst of the Marvel Generations one shots?

Stillanerd Reviews: Generations: The Iron (Iron Man and Ironheart) #1 review
I'm wondering, Mike; what would it take for you to give something a "F" grade? Because this story sounds absolutely dreadful. I'm not even an Iron Man reader, but I can't imagine any Tony Stark fans would find that story the least bit respectful towards such an enduring and iconic character.

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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by stillanerd » Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:45 pm

Masked Guy wrote:
stillanerd wrote:So Generations: The Iron (Iron Man and Ironheart #1? Worst of the Marvel Generations one-shots, or...worst of the Marvel Generations one shots?

Stillanerd Reviews: Generations: The Iron (Iron Man and Ironheart) #1 review
I'm wondering, Mike; what would it take for you to give something a "F" grade? Because this story sounds absolutely dreadful. I'm not even an Iron Man reader, but I can't imagine any Tony Stark fans would find that story the least bit respectful towards such an enduring and iconic character.
Well like I said the chat when doing the Crawlspace livestream, it takes a special kind of awful to get an F grade. Like the Amazing Spider-Man "Amazing Grace" issues where, in order to explain why Peter is agnostic, literally re-wrote Uncle Ben's death. Or Ultimate End during Secret Wars which pulled what amounts to a One More Day on Miles Morales. Things like those.

Oh, and if you think the Generations Iron Man was awful, so was Generations: Captain Marvel & Captain Mar-Vell. Not as horrible as Generations: Iron Man & Ironheart, because there's at least a semblance of plot with a beginning, middle, and end. But good gravy, everything else is mediocre. Not to mention it pretty much beat into a pulp The Wizard of Oz as a pop culture reference.

Stillanerd Reviews: Generations: The Bravest (Captain Marvel & Captain Mar-Vell) #1 review
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Re: What was the last comic you read?

Post by Masked Guy » Thu Sep 14, 2017 1:22 pm

stillanerd wrote:
Masked Guy wrote:
stillanerd wrote:So Generations: The Iron (Iron Man and Ironheart #1? Worst of the Marvel Generations one-shots, or...worst of the Marvel Generations one shots?

Stillanerd Reviews: Generations: The Iron (Iron Man and Ironheart) #1 review
I'm wondering, Mike; what would it take for you to give something a "F" grade? Because this story sounds absolutely dreadful. I'm not even an Iron Man reader, but I can't imagine any Tony Stark fans would find that story the least bit respectful towards such an enduring and iconic character.
Well like I said the chat when doing the Crawlspace livestream, it takes a special kind of awful to get an F grade. Like the Amazing Spider-Man "Amazing Grace" issues where, in order to explain why Peter is agnostic, literally re-wrote Uncle Ben's death. Or Ultimate End during Secret Wars which pulled what amounts to a One More Day on Miles Morales. Things like those.

Oh, and if you think the Generations Iron Man was awful, so was Generations: Captain Marvel & Captain Mar-Vell. Not as horrible as Generations: Iron Man & Ironheart, because there's at least a semblance of plot with a beginning, middle, and end. But good gravy, everything else is mediocre. Not to mention it pretty much beat into a pulp The Wizard of Oz as a pop culture reference.

Stillanerd Reviews: Generations: The Bravest (Captain Marvel & Captain Mar-Vell) #1 review
I haven't been keeping up with the Generations books after the Wolverine one. That was bad enough.

But other than Amazing Grace and obviously One More Day, are there any other Spider-Man stories that come to mind that you would give a "F" to? I'd assume One Moment in Time would be another?

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